Speaking at QCon London 2016

I am pleased to announce that I’ll be speaking at this year’s QCon London. I’ll be speaking in the “Modern CS in the real world” track, hosted by none other than Adrian Colyer, from the morning paper.  The abstract for my talk,  Making the Impossible Possible is as follows:

In this talk, we explore how to construct resilient distributed systems on top of unreliable components.

Starting, almost two decades ago, with Leslie Lamport’s work on organising parliament for a Greek island. We will take a journey to today’s datacenters and the systems powering companies like Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Along the way, we will face interesting impossibility results, machines acting maliciously and the complexity of today’s networks.

Ultimately, we will discover how to reach agreement between many parties and from this, how to construct new fault-tolerance systems that we can depend upon everyday.

The talk will be based upon the material from my master lecture, Reaching reliable agreement in an unreliable world. The slides for which are online and below.

BBC Radio 4: Any questions?

I asked a question on today’s BBC radio 4 show “Any questions?”, http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06b3ny4, skip to 42:07 to hear me nervously ask “How can we protect the rights of citizens in an increasingly digital world?” and hear the panel’s response. The responses where fairly disappointing but it helps to keep the debate alive.

Unanimous: System Research Group talklet

I’m looking forward to sharing my thoughts on consensus for the edge network with the SRG today, abstract below

Many projects in the SRG at the moment (HAT, UCN, contacts app, MirageOS for ARM, Jitsu, databox, signposts) are trying to give individuals an viable alternative to 3rd party centralised services and put them back in control of their personal data. However developing applications for the hostile edge network, with its heterogeneous hosts and networks, trust issues and poorly understood middle boxes is tricky. This is made worse by the fact that consensus algorithms are famously difficult to use, underspecified and based on decade old assumption about the internet. In this talklet, I will motivate Unanimous, a new consensus algorithm for the modern internet.

NB: this is a practice talk for EuroSys doctoral workshop next Tuesday, thus this 5 min talk will simply motivate a research direction instead of presenting a complete solution.
EDIT (17/4): these slides are now online

Poster for “Life on the Edge: New Abstractions for Edge Network Distributed Computing”

Here is a draft copy of the A1 poster I’ll be presenting at the 2nd Annual Oxbridge Women in Computer Science Conference in Oxford. The poster abstract is in a previous post. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

version 1 (9:20 11/3)

women@cl poster

 

version 2 (10:50 11/3)

now with left alignment of text on the left and right alignment of text on the right, gateway text on black router removed

women@cl poster

 

VERSION 3 (11:00 11/3)

now with bolded keywords

women@cl poster (3)

 

FINAL VERSION (11:23 11/3)

new text for the aim box

women@cl poster (4)

Slides for “Life on the Edge: New Abstractions for Edge Network Distributed Computing”

Below are my draft slides for next week’s talk at the 2nd Annual Oxbridge Women in Computer Science Conference in Oxford. The talk abstract is in a previous post. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated (note that the speaker notes are WIP)

3 Upcoming talks

I’ve just updated my Research pages with 3 upcoming talks. More details to follow, in particular the topic for the April talk at the Computer Lab, as I cannot reuse the topics from either of the other talks.

“TBC” – Women@CL Talklet Series, University of Cambridge, April 2015

“Life on the Edge (Network)” – 2nd Oxbridge Women in Computer Science Conference, Oxford University, March 2015

On the Edge: Future-proofing the Internet with Signposts” – Systems Research Group Talklet, Date TBC